Resources

Introduction: Legitimacy and peace processes

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Accord 25 co-editors Achim Wennmann and Alexander Ramsbotham provide an introduction to the publication, offering a brief elaboration on its structure and concept, and introducing the focus of the publication's subsequent articles.

What is legitimacy and why does it matter for peace?

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Kevin Clements opens the publication by exploring why legitimacy matters for peace, reviewing the rich and long intellectual tradition of political legitimacy.

Afghanistan - Local governance, national reconciliation and community reintegration

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Karim Merchant and Ghulam Rasoul Rasouli analyse attempts in Afghanistan to use Community Development Councils (CDCs) to roll out a national reintegration programme for ex-combatants at the local level. The CDCs’ main function is to implement the National Solidarity Program (NSP), established in 2003 as “the largest people’s project in the history of Afghanistan”.

Local governance and peacebuilding: challenges of legitimate representation

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Ken Menkhaus asks how viable it is to mobilise the legitimacy of local leadership for peace. Legitimate representation is difficult to identify in talks to end violent conflict that can include a proliferation of armed groups, severe social and political fragmentation, or communal or criminal violence.

Border community security: Mano River Union region

Aug 2013
This research report presents key findings from the selected border region locations in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. It outlines key challenges to border communities in the region, with the aim of informing policy dialogues with relevant national government authorities on cross-border community security.

Event: Civil Society, Peace and the Basque Country - London, 4 June

May 2013

Tuesday 4 June 2013, 6.30pm-8pm

Committee Room 18, Houses of Parliament, London SW1A 0AA

Chair: Lord Alderdice 

Some eighteen months after the Aiete Conference and ETA's definitive cessation of armed action, civil society in the Basque country organised a social forum to promote civil society participation in the peace process. The Forum addressed three outstanding topics:

Lebanon: a fate beyond its control? (Open Security)

Sep 2012
With violence in Syria making the headlines, Zahbia Yousuf and Marie-Joelle Zahar examine to what extent Lebanon can be responsible for its own fate, plus who's working to build peace, and how.

The Taif Agreement

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Karam Karam explains how both the content and implementation of the 1989 Taif peace agreement have precluded genuine political reform or social change, due to structural defects including: flawed revision of confessional power sharing arrangements and a dysfunctional executive Troika; surrendering core state responsibilities to Syrian tutelage; guaranteeing power to warlords; and the marginalisation of key social issues. Karam suggests constructive lessons for the future, based on a framework of political decentralisation and balanced reform ‘packages’ as part of a clear, incremental strategy.

Reconstruction and peace in Lebanon - post-war economic policy: a conversation with Sami Atallah

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Post-war reconstruction in Lebanon has favoured the powerful. Exploring the intricacies of monetary and fiscal policies, Sami Atallah explains intrinsic and unhealthy links between politics and economics in Lebanon since the end of the war and how these have impacted negatively on social justice and stability. He also points to the failure of international engagement to challenge these dynamics.

Internal choice or external fate?

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Marie-Joëlle Zahar challenges prevailing perceptions of the Lebanese as powerless victims of their external environment. She suggests that the roots of Lebanon’s vulnerability are internal and emanate from state weakness, as suspicion among Lebanese communities and endemic distrust of Beirut to uphold citizens’ interests encourages Lebanese leaders to actively seek protection from abroad.

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