Resources

Indigenous people 'provoke' peace in Colombia

Jul 2012

In mid-July communities in the Cauca region (south-west Colombia) made it into the national and international headlines. The country was caught by surprise when they saw hundreds of unarmed indigenous people expelling both the army and the guerrillas from their territories.

Comunidades Indígenas “provocan” la paz en Colombia

Jul 2012
A mediados de julio, comunidades indígenas del Cauca (región al sur-oeste de Colombia) aparecieron en los titulares nacionales e internacionales. El país entero fue sorprendido al ver centenares de indígenas desarmados exigiendo la expulsión de sus territorios, tanto de la guerrilla como del ejército. Kristian Herbolzheimer sitúa estos hechos en el contexto de una lucha constante por la paz y la autonomía.

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking (Somali)

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process

Oct 2004

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Accord issue 15, 2004) asks ‘what next?’ for a nation that has secured a ‘military peace’ but still faces huge challenges in post-conflict peacebuilding and a secessionist war in Cabinda. It provides lessons from Angola’s history of conflict and peacemaking, and reviews past peace processes and the roles played by Angolan civil society, institutions such as the United Nations and foreign governments.

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Portuguese)

Oct 2004

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Accord issue 15, 2004) asks ‘what next?’ for a nation that has secured a ‘military peace’ but still faces huge challenges in post-conflict peacebuilding and a secessionist war in Cabinda. It provides lessons from Angola’s history of conflict and peacemaking, and reviews past peace processes and the roles played by Angolan civil society, institutions such as the United Nations and foreign governments.

The Mindanao peace process: A supplement to Compromising on autonomy (2003)

Apr 2003

The 1996 Peace Agreement between the Republic of the Philippines government and Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) was a milestone in many ways: all previous attempts to negotiate an end to 24 years of civil war had failed. Implementation of the peace deal did not end the violence but the efforts and innovations in peacemaking in Mindanao offer invaluable examples for people working to resolve conflicts around the world.

Accord issue 6, Compromising on autonomy: Mindanao in transition, contains analysis on Islamic diplomacy, civil society roles and development.

Weaving consensus: The Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process

Sep 2002

The peace agreement signed in 2001 on the island of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea (PNG), ended the most violent conflict in the South Pacific since World War II. Weaving consensus: the Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process (Accord issue 12, 2002) outlines an extraordinary array of creative initiatives and interventions that succeeded not only in ending the organised violence but brought together Bougainvillean society within a national framework. The process defined a negotiated settlement acceptable to all.

Constitutional accommodation and conflict prevention

Weaving consensus: The Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process
Sep 2002
Accord Papua New Guinea: Constitutional accommodation and conflict prevention
Yash Ghai and Anthony Regan describe the process that resulted in Bougainville declaring itself independent as the Republic of North Solomons, before being reincorporated into PNG through the Bougainville Agreement in 1976.

Negotiating rights: The Guatemala peace process

Nov 1997

The signing of peace agreements in 1996 ended 36 years of civil war between the Guatemalan government and the Marxist rebel army, Guatemalan National Revolutionary Unit. The peace process went beyond an arrangement between armed groups, allowing regional and civic actors to advance their concerns on issues of social justice, political power-sharing and the rule of law.

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