The Mozambican peace process in perspective 
Publication date: 
1998
Accord issue: 
3

Five years on from the Rome accord, intermittent violence and social unrest in rural areas pose a persistent threat to the fragile peace. Alcinda Honwana discusses how Western approaches to post-violence trauma healing and reconciliation are not suitable for rural Mozambique, where most of the fighting occurred. Traditional practices are popular and bring stability to post-conflict communities. Although there is always a risk of impunity from these practices, it is important that future justice mechanisms are based on local demands. The article also features a box João Paulo Borges Coelho explaining ‘purification’ and ‘reconciliation’ among ex-combatants.