Resources

Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon (Accord 24) - English version

Jul 2012

Lebanon’s model of post-war power sharing and liberal economic growth has been widely praised. But it has failed to deliver for most Lebanese. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Agreement, and today fear of spillover from insecurity in Syria, show that a fundamentally different approach is needed to transform negative and precarious stability in Lebanon into positive and resilient peace.

Policy brief – Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon

Jul 2012
A fundamentally different approach is needed to transform precarious stability in Lebanon into durable peace. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Accord show that Lebanon’s model of power sharing and liberal economic growth, while widely praised, has in reality failed to deliver a noticeable peace dividend. This 6-page policy brief summarises the findings of Accord 24 and sets out 10 priorities for change.

Conclusion: building peace and resilience for Lebanon

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
In their conclusion, Accord 24 co-editors Elizabeth Picard and Alexander Ramsbotham outline the progress needed to achieve durable peace in Lebanon. These include the need to tackle state-sponsored amnesia and sectarian narratives of the past; to meaningfully rebuild the social contract between state and society; to reinforce Lebanon's internal resilience in the face on external threats and intervention.

Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon (Accord 24) - Arabic version

Jul 2012

Lebanon’s model of post-war power sharing and liberal economic growth has been widely praised. But it has failed to deliver for most Lebanese. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Agreement, and today fear of spillover from insecurity in Syria, show that a fundamentally different approach is needed to transform negative and precarious stability in Lebanon into positive and resilient peace.

Conclusion: consolidating peace

Consolidating peace: Liberia and Sierra Leone
Mar 2012
This conclusion to Accord 23 makes suggestions for peacebuilding policy and practice. It argues that peacebuilding policy needs to concentrate more on people, and building relationships between communities, and between communities and the state.

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

Private sector peacemaking: business and reconstruction in Somalia

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Questioning the international focus on politics and statebuilding as prerequisites for economic recovery, Lee Cassanelli identifies in private sector-led economic recovery the potential to alter Somalia’s current political trajectory.

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking (Somali)

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

A question for the global community

Aug 2008
As Russia agrees to a ceasefire, Rachel Clogg of Conciliation Resources looks in this article at two crucial questions about its conflict with Georgia: how did the conflict come about and where do we go from here?

© Conciliation Resources Burghley Yard, 106 Burghley Road, London NW5 1AL
Tel: +44 (0)20 7359 7728  Fax: +44(0)20 7359 4081  Email: cr@c-r.org
Terms and conditions
Charity registered in England and Wales (1055436)
Company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (03196482)