Resources

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent (Accord 25)

Apr 2014
Legitimacy matters for peace. It is the basis of the social and political deals between states and citizens, and local leaders and their communities. Legitimacy transforms coercive power into political authority and is the bedrock of peaceful societies. Looking at 15 country case studies at various stages of conflict, this edition in our Accord series focuses on legitimacy and the practical ways that it can contribute to building more sustainable peace.

Policy brief - Legitimacy and peace process: from coercion to consent

Apr 2014
This 6-page policy brief summarises the findings of Accord 25 - Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent. It argues that a legitimacy lens should be applied to peace processes by paying attention to priorities of context, consent and change.

Introduction: Legitimacy and peace processes

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Accord 25 co-editors Achim Wennmann and Alexander Ramsbotham provide an introduction to the publication, offering a brief elaboration on its structure and concept, and introducing the focus of the publication's subsequent articles.

What is legitimacy and why does it matter for peace?

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Kevin Clements opens the publication by exploring why legitimacy matters for peace, reviewing the rich and long intellectual tradition of political legitimacy.

Burma - national dialogue: armed groups, contested legitimacy and political transition

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Harn Yawngwhe explores the genesis of the national dialogue process in Burma. Peacebuilding in Burma has a daunting agenda to accommodate an array of competing claimants to legitimacy, including the government and the army, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, political parties, civil society, ethnic entities, and more than 18 ethnic armed groups.

Local governance and peacebuilding: challenges of legitimate representation

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Ken Menkhaus asks how viable it is to mobilise the legitimacy of local leadership for peace. Legitimate representation is difficult to identify in talks to end violent conflict that can include a proliferation of armed groups, severe social and political fragmentation, or communal or criminal violence.

Syria - Organising for the future: grassroots governance and national peace

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Doreen Khoury describes how analyses of the conflict in Syria routinely ignore the achievements of grassroots opposition and the resilience of the Syrian people. Syrian society is the ultimate target of deadly sectarian violence between shabbiha (regime enforcers) and jihadist groups.

Brazil - Citizenship, violence and authority in Rio’s favelas

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Joanna Wheeler explores relationships between citizenship, violence and authority in Rio’s favelas in Brazil. Drug trafficking groups and para-state militias have become dominant actors in the city’s informal settlements.

Accord Insight II project and publication: Local civil society engagement of non-state armed groups

Jan 2014

There is continuing uncertainty at the policy level over how and when to engage non-state armed groups (NSAGs). There has also been little focus on how community-based actors reach out to and are reached by NSAGs. Understanding local interactions with NSAGs may provide better analysis of a group’s dynamics as well as provide entry points for dialogue when formal channels are blocked. However there are a number of challenges and risks, as well as opportunities, for those that reach out to NSAGs. 

Reflections: joint analysis workshop on engaging non-state armed groups

Nov 2013

Conciliation Resources held a one-day expert joint analysis workshop in London on 1 November 2013 to discuss civil society responses and community engagement with armed groups. The event brought together 30 international peacebuilding practitioners and academics to discuss their experiences of the topic. Here Ed Garcia, a participant of the workshop, presents his reflections of the workshop.

 

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