Resources

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

Political representation in Somalia: citizenship, clanism and territoriality

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Markus Hoehne examines Somali notions of ‘belonging’ and reviews political representation in internationally-mediated peace conferences and local political representation in Sool region.

Order out of chaos: Somali customary law in Puntland and Somaliland

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Abdulrahman Osman ‘Shuke’ describes how local peace processes draw on traditional practices of negotiation, mediation and arbitration conducted by clan elders using customary law as a moral and legal framework.

The role of Somaliland elders in making and keeping peace: a conversation with Hajji Abdi Hussein Yusuf

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Hajji Abdi Hussein Yusuf, a respected elder from Somaliland, discusses the qualities that Somali elders are expected to possess and the role they play in maintaining peace.

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking (Somali)

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

Weaving consensus: The Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process

Sep 2002

The peace agreement signed in 2001 on the island of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea (PNG), ended the most violent conflict in the South Pacific since World War II. Weaving consensus: the Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process (Accord issue 12, 2002) outlines an extraordinary array of creative initiatives and interventions that succeeded not only in ending the organised violence but brought together Bougainvillean society within a national framework. The process defined a negotiated settlement acceptable to all.

Constitutional accommodation and conflict prevention

Weaving consensus: The Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process
Sep 2002
Accord Papua New Guinea: Constitutional accommodation and conflict prevention
Yash Ghai and Anthony Regan describe the process that resulted in Bougainville declaring itself independent as the Republic of North Solomons, before being reincorporated into PNG through the Bougainville Agreement in 1976.

Early interventions

Weaving consensus: The Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process
Sep 2002
Accord Papua New Guinea: Early interventions
Peter Sohia traces how negotiations on Bougainville’s relationship to the PNG government developed from 1980s to the mid-1990s. He argues that, despite their repeated failures, these efforts form part of an important cumulative process towards peace.

Negotiating rights: The Guatemala peace process

Nov 1997

The signing of peace agreements in 1996 ended 36 years of civil war between the Guatemalan government and the Marxist rebel army, Guatemalan National Revolutionary Unit. The peace process went beyond an arrangement between armed groups, allowing regional and civic actors to advance their concerns on issues of social justice, political power-sharing and the rule of law.

Reframing citizenship: Indigenous rights, local power and the peace process in Guatemala

Negotiating rights: The Guatemala peace process
Nov 1997
Accord Guatemala: Reframing citizenship
Rachel Sieder describes how indigenous Mayan civil society groups secured protection for their social cultural and political rights and assesses the opportunities and weaknesses presented by the accords.

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