Resources

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking (Somali)

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Portuguese)

Oct 2004

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Accord issue 15, 2004) asks ‘what next?’ for a nation that has secured a ‘military peace’ but still faces huge challenges in post-conflict peacebuilding and a secessionist war in Cabinda. It provides lessons from Angola’s history of conflict and peacemaking, and reviews past peace processes and the roles played by Angolan civil society, institutions such as the United Nations and foreign governments.

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process

Oct 2004

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Accord issue 15, 2004) asks ‘what next?’ for a nation that has secured a ‘military peace’ but still faces huge challenges in post-conflict peacebuilding and a secessionist war in Cabinda. It provides lessons from Angola’s history of conflict and peacemaking, and reviews past peace processes and the roles played by Angolan civil society, institutions such as the United Nations and foreign governments.

Weaving consensus: The Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process

Sep 2002

The peace agreement signed in 2001 on the island of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea (PNG), ended the most violent conflict in the South Pacific since World War II. Weaving consensus: the Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process (Accord issue 12, 2002) outlines an extraordinary array of creative initiatives and interventions that succeeded not only in ending the organised violence but brought together Bougainvillean society within a national framework. The process defined a negotiated settlement acceptable to all.

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