Resources

Introduction: Legitimacy and peace processes

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Accord 25 co-editors Achim Wennmann and Alexander Ramsbotham provide an introduction to the publication, offering a brief elaboration on its structure and concept, and introducing the focus of the publication's subsequent articles.

What is legitimacy and why does it matter for peace?

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Kevin Clements opens the publication by exploring why legitimacy matters for peace, reviewing the rich and long intellectual tradition of political legitimacy.

Burma - national dialogue: armed groups, contested legitimacy and political transition

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Harn Yawngwhe explores the genesis of the national dialogue process in Burma. Peacebuilding in Burma has a daunting agenda to accommodate an array of competing claimants to legitimacy, including the government and the army, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, political parties, civil society, ethnic entities, and more than 18 ethnic armed groups.

Accord 25 Joint analysis workshop report: Legitimacy and peace processes

Aug 2013
Legitimacy in peace processes includes participation – so people have a voice; representation – so people's concerns are heard; and performance – so people see results. Legitimacy is vital to the support of a peace process, and can help make peace stick. To explore how legitimacy can help build sustainable peace, Conciliation Resources brought together 38 practitioners, policymakers and stakeholders from a diversity of backgrounds for a two-day reflection.

Event: Civil Society, Peace and the Basque Country - London, 4 June

May 2013

Tuesday 4 June 2013, 6.30pm-8pm

Committee Room 18, Houses of Parliament, London SW1A 0AA

Chair: Lord Alderdice 

Some eighteen months after the Aiete Conference and ETA's definitive cessation of armed action, civil society in the Basque country organised a social forum to promote civil society participation in the peace process. The Forum addressed three outstanding topics:

Box 4 - The question of secularisation in Lebanon: a conversation with Fawwaz Traboulsi

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Fawwaz Traboulsi discusses secularisation, in particular Lebanon’s constitutional schizophrenia that simultaneously promises and precludes deconfessionalisation. He also considers the problems of religious consensus and of maintaining the political status quo, and the relationship between secularisation and Lebanese national identity.

Box 5 - Priorities for peace in Lebanon: opposing outlooks from 8 & 14 March Alliances

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Interviews with Ali Fayyad (8 March Alliance/Hezbollah MP) and Samir Frangieh (member of the General Secretariat of 14 March Alliance and a former MP) present ‘opposing outlooks’ from Lebanon’s two main political blocs. They discuss: internal and external sources of tension; implications of Taif for contemporary political stability; developing the social contract in Lebanon; and priorities for the future.

Armed groups and sovereignty

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Joseph Bahout examines armed groups in Lebanon and their various agendas, internal and external. He focuses on Hezbollah: its relations with both its domestic constituency and with Syria, and its role as a resistance force to Israel. He reflects on the potential impact of the Syrian crisis, and the challenges that overlapping agendas present within Lebanon – for dialogue and internal consensus, and for stability and sovereignty.

Negative external intervention and peace in Lebanon

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Michael Kerr reviews the largely negative impact of external interventions in Lebanon with regard to consolidating peace. These are primarily driven by external (often conflicting) strategic interests, and interact with Lebanon’s sectarian political power sharing system to encourage and embed rivalry amongst Lebanese leaders seeking external patronage. The online version of Michael Kerr’s article includes a comparative analysis of power sharing and external relationships in Lebanon and Northern Ireland.

Palestinians in Lebanon

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
The Palestinian question has weighed heavily in Lebanon, before, during and after the war. Sari Hanafi explores the contemporary status of Palestinians in Lebanon – legally and socio-economically. He focuses on governance within Palestinian camps and relations with broader Lebanese politics, arguing that a more constructive approach to governance and rights for Palestinians would in fact reinforce Lebanese sovereignty and security.

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