Resources

Reconfiguring politics: The Indonesia-Aceh peace process (Indonesian)

Sep 2008
Reconfiguring politics: the Indonesia-Aceh peace process, edited by Aguswandi and Judith Large, analyses developments leading to the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding between the Indonesian government and the Free Aceh Movement (GAM) in August 2005, and how this agreement has been put into practice.

Peace by piece: Addressing Sudan’s conflicts (Arabic: Part 2)

Dec 2006
Accord 18 focuses on Sudan and asks which issues were excluded from the process leading to the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. It suggests that future initiatives must be more inclusive and better coordinated.

Peace by piece: Addressing Sudan’s conflicts (Arabic: Part 1)

Dec 2006
Accord 18 focuses on Sudan and asks which issues were excluded from the process leading to the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. It suggests that future initiatives must be more inclusive and better coordinated.

Peace by piece: Addressing Sudan’s conflicts

Dec 2006
Accord 18 focuses on Sudan and asks which issues were excluded from the process leading to the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. It suggests that future initiatives must be more inclusive and better coordinated.

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Portuguese)

Oct 2004

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Accord issue 15, 2004) asks ‘what next?’ for a nation that has secured a ‘military peace’ but still faces huge challenges in post-conflict peacebuilding and a secessionist war in Cabinda. It provides lessons from Angola’s history of conflict and peacemaking, and reviews past peace processes and the roles played by Angolan civil society, institutions such as the United Nations and foreign governments.

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process

Oct 2004

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Accord issue 15, 2004) asks ‘what next?’ for a nation that has secured a ‘military peace’ but still faces huge challenges in post-conflict peacebuilding and a secessionist war in Cabinda. It provides lessons from Angola’s history of conflict and peacemaking, and reviews past peace processes and the roles played by Angolan civil society, institutions such as the United Nations and foreign governments.

Alternativas a la guerra: Iniciativas y procesos de paz en Colombia

Feb 2004
Alternativas a la guerra: Iniciativas y procesos de paz en Colombia (Accord N°14, 2004) es una introducción a más de tres décadas de esfuerzos en la construcción de paz. Revela el asombroso trabajo de civiles en las regiones y a nivel nacional, y documenta los principales rasgos y resultados de los procesos formales de paz con las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC), El Ejercito de Liberación Nacional (ELN), otros grupos guerrilleros más pequeños, y más recientemente los paramilitares.

Alternatives to war: Colombia’s peace processes

Feb 2004

Alternatives to war: Colombia’s peace processes (Accord issue 14, 2004) is an introduction to more than three decades of peacemaking efforts. It reveals the extraordinary work of civilians at grassroots, regional and national levels, and documents the main features and outcomes of formal peace processes with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), smaller guerrilla groups and more recently the paramilitaries.

Weaving consensus: The Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process

Sep 2002

The peace agreement signed in 2001 on the island of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea (PNG), ended the most violent conflict in the South Pacific since World War II. Weaving consensus: the Papua New Guinea - Bougainville peace process (Accord issue 12, 2002) outlines an extraordinary array of creative initiatives and interventions that succeeded not only in ending the organised violence but brought together Bougainvillean society within a national framework. The process defined a negotiated settlement acceptable to all.

Negotiating rights: The Guatemala peace process

Nov 1997

The signing of peace agreements in 1996 ended 36 years of civil war between the Guatemalan government and the Marxist rebel army, Guatemalan National Revolutionary Unit. The peace process went beyond an arrangement between armed groups, allowing regional and civic actors to advance their concerns on issues of social justice, political power-sharing and the rule of law.

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