Resources

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent (Accord 25)

Apr 2014
Legitimacy matters for peace. It is the basis of the social and political deals between states and citizens, and local leaders and their communities. Legitimacy transforms coercive power into political authority and is the bedrock of peaceful societies. Looking at 15 country case studies at various stages of conflict, this edition in our Accord series focuses on legitimacy and the practical ways that it can contribute to building more sustainable peace.

Policy brief - Legitimacy and peace process: from coercion to consent

Apr 2014
This 6-page policy brief summarises the findings of Accord 25 - Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent. It argues that a legitimacy lens should be applied to peace processes by paying attention to priorities of context, consent and change.

What’s in a label? EU listing of Hezbollah and challenges to Lebanon’s peace

Jun 2013
With the European Union reportedly meeting this week – June 2013 – to discuss whether to add Hezbollah to its list of terrorist organisations, Zahbia Yousuf and Sophie Haspeslagh highlight the limits of such a blunt tool.

Lebanon: a fate beyond its control? (Open Security)

Sep 2012
With violence in Syria making the headlines, Zahbia Yousuf and Marie-Joelle Zahar examine to what extent Lebanon can be responsible for its own fate, plus who's working to build peace, and how.

Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon (Accord 24) - English version

Jul 2012

Lebanon’s model of post-war power sharing and liberal economic growth has been widely praised. But it has failed to deliver for most Lebanese. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Agreement, and today fear of spillover from insecurity in Syria, show that a fundamentally different approach is needed to transform negative and precarious stability in Lebanon into positive and resilient peace.

Policy brief – Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon

Jul 2012
A fundamentally different approach is needed to transform precarious stability in Lebanon into durable peace. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Accord show that Lebanon’s model of power sharing and liberal economic growth, while widely praised, has in reality failed to deliver a noticeable peace dividend. This 6-page policy brief summarises the findings of Accord 24 and sets out 10 priorities for change.

Whose Lebanon? A post-war history of people, power and peace initiatives

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
In this article, Accord 24 co-editors Alexander Ramsbotham and Elizabeth Picard offer a brief reflection on Lebanon's recent history. They outline the challenges facing a durable peace in Lebanon, including a lack of political reform, threats to Lebanese sovereignty, and an inegalitarian economic development.

Box 5 - Priorities for peace in Lebanon: opposing outlooks from 8 & 14 March Alliances

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Interviews with Ali Fayyad (8 March Alliance/Hezbollah MP) and Samir Frangieh (member of the General Secretariat of 14 March Alliance and a former MP) present ‘opposing outlooks’ from Lebanon’s two main political blocs. They discuss: internal and external sources of tension; implications of Taif for contemporary political stability; developing the social contract in Lebanon; and priorities for the future.

The Special Tribunal for Lebanon

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Chandra Lekha Sriram asks if the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, set up to investigate the 2005 assassination of Prime Minister Rafiq al-Hariri, can support a broader function for transitional justice and peace. To date, both the creation and subsequent operation of the tribunal have been politically divisive, generating parliamentary stand-offs and government collapse.

Internal choice or external fate?

Positive peace for Lebanon: reconciliation, reform and resilience
Jul 2012
Marie-Joëlle Zahar challenges prevailing perceptions of the Lebanese as powerless victims of their external environment. She suggests that the roots of Lebanon’s vulnerability are internal and emanate from state weakness, as suspicion among Lebanese communities and endemic distrust of Beirut to uphold citizens’ interests encourages Lebanese leaders to actively seek protection from abroad.

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