Resources

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent (Accord 25)

Apr 2014
Legitimacy matters for peace. It is the basis of the social and political deals between states and citizens, and local leaders and their communities. Legitimacy transforms coercive power into political authority and is the bedrock of peaceful societies. Looking at 15 country case studies at various stages of conflict, this edition in our Accord series focuses on legitimacy and the practical ways that it can contribute to building more sustainable peace.

Policy brief - Legitimacy and peace process: from coercion to consent

Apr 2014
This 6-page policy brief summarises the findings of Accord 25 - Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent. It argues that a legitimacy lens should be applied to peace processes by paying attention to priorities of context, consent and change.

Constitutional review in peace processes: securing local ownership

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Cheryl Saunders explains how a constitution can help safeguard foundations for peace by developing a new or revised framework for state-society relations. The “performance legitimacy” of a new constitution (how it works in practice) is a major test, assessed over time through the effectiveness of the state and its level of popular approval.

Case study: Somalia

Accord Insight: Women building peace
Mar 2013
As part of a set of case studies shedding light on the role of women in peacebuilding, Faiza Jama's article is taken from Accord issue 21 (2010), focusing on Somalia.

Can the London conference on Somalia get it right this time?

Feb 2012

Can the London conference on Somalia succeed this time where others have failed? After a year in which large swathes of Somalia have been hit by famine and continued war, and international militarisation has markedly increased, the UK government’s initiative to host an international conference on Somalia on 23 February is welcome. But lessons must be learnt from past mistakes. Ahead of the conference, Mark Bradbury makes the case that support should be given to local Somali-led solutions that promote legitimacy and participation.

Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking

Feb 2010
Accord 21, Whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking, seeks to improve understanding and links between Somalis and international policy and practice. Edited by Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy it contains over 30 articles including interviews with Somali elders and senior diplomats, and contributions from Somali and international peacemaking practitioners, academics, involved parties, civil society and women’s organisations.

Introduction: whose peace is it anyway? connecting Somali and international peacemaking

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy introduce the Accord 21 project and publication on Somali peace processes. They discuss how it has focused on Somali and international peacemaking and how better to link the two.

Endless war: a brief history of the Somali conflict

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Mark Bradbury and Sally Healy describe the changing nature of the Somali crisis over the past 20 years and review international and regional reconciliation efforts in Somalia and their impact on peace, conflict and governance.

Diplomacy in a failed state: international mediation in Somalia

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Ken Menkhaus critiques six Somali peace conferences to establish why intensive diplomatic interventions have failed to end the Somali crisis.

Mediating Djibouti

Whose peace is it anyway? Connecting Somali and international peacemaking
Feb 2010
Meredith Preston McGhie describes the UN mediation in the 2008 peace talks in Djibouti between the Transitional Federal Government and the Alliance for the Re-liberation of Somalia.

Pages

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