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Creating safe spaces for youth to build peace

This year, the UN’s International Youth Day is championing safe spaces for youth - places where young people can come together, express themselves, and participate in decision making. In peacebuilding, creating these safe spaces is a vital first step in allowing young people to share their experiences of conflict, and work towards achieving a more peaceful future.

10 steps for peace in Afghanistan

Jul 2018
Accord Cover Image
The Eid ceasefires in June showed that peace is possible in Afghanistan and is supported across Afghan society. This Accord Policy Brief outlines ten incremental steps that the government of Afghanistan and international partners can take to advance peace, based on findings from our new Accord publication.

The ceasefire is essential – but what should happen next for peace in Afghanistan?

The recent experience of a temporary ceasefire by both the Afghan Government, and, for the first time since they were ousted from power in 2001, the Taliban, could be a first step on an incremental journey towards peace. But what should happen next and how can this gradual progress towards peace be supported?

Film: Incremental peace in Afghanistan

A radical new approach is needed in Afghanistan to build peace step-by-step. In this film, Accord editors Anna Larson and Alexander Ramsbotham, and Accord adviser Michael Semple, discuss what you can expect from the publication.

Accord - Incremental peace in Afghanistan

Jun 2018
Accord Cover of Incremental Peace in Afghanistan
A radical new approach is needed in Afghanistan to build peace step-by-step. There needs to be a move beyond peace rhetoric, through a progressive, step-by-step process towards a political settlement which builds stability, confidence and legitimacy over time. The short-term objective should be a reduction in violence. The long-term objective should be to achieve a more inclusive peace process that is representative of, and endorsed by, Afghan society as a whole. In this Accord, contributors including Afghan and international men and women from academia, the military, government, armed opposition and civil society, examine the prospects for peace in the country, and how this could be achieved. This report is an output of the Political Settlements Research Programme.

Annual Report 2017

May 2018

Read this annual review of our work in 2017. Highlights include: establishing a network of peace platforms in northeast Nigeria to engage youth, strengthening the abilities of indigenous women in Colombia to monitor implementation of the peace agreement, and building relationships between civil society and the military in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Film: Things that make for peace

I think the most important thing about making for peace is recognising our common humanity.

Film: What makes an effective peacebuilding partnership?

Collaborative partnerships are at the heart of the way Conciliation Resources works. We believe in genuine, two-way partnerships, characterised by mutual support and learning. In our latest film, our partners and staff share their thoughts on what makes an effective peacebuilding partnership.

Partnership in peacebuilding

May 2018
This report offers insights and lessons from Conciliation Resources' own practice and approach to partnering. It is part of a study into how partnership between international non-governmental organisations and civil society organisation and networks in conflict-affected contexts can support inclusive and transformative peacebuilding. Our research explored the rationale and assumptions behind Conciliation Resources’ partnering approach and looked at how these play out in practice.

6 ways to support gender inclusion in peace transitions

Participation of women and other excluded groups in peace talks and political bargaining is important for sustainable peace. Clear opportunities to support gender inclusion exist in all phases of a peace process – before, during and after a peace agreement.

Balancing stability and inclusion in peace transitions: a way forward

Inclusive societies are more resilient and less prone to violent conflict, and achieving greater inclusion is a widely accepted peacebuilding goal. What’s less obvious however, is the journey people in less equal and inclusive societies need to take to get there.
 
There’s no tried and trusted formula for this.

Navigating inclusion in peace transitions

May 2018
Based on analysis of four contexts (Nepal, Nigeria, the Somali Region of Ethiopia (Ogaden) and Colombia) this report explores how inclusion is negotiated in peace processes and associated avenues for resolving conflict and effecting political change. While analysis of peacebuilding and peace processes often focuses on elite-led negotiations, this research examines how change is perceived by those living in conflict-affected contexts, and strategies used by different groups to influence political change.

Gendered political settlements

May 2018
Based on analysis of three contexts (Bougainville, an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea, Nepal and Colombia) this report explores how gender inclusion – meaningful participation at all levels of decision making, regardless of a person’s gender identity – is negotiated in elite-led peace processes and political settlements in conflict-affected contexts, and how international and national actors can support it effectively.

Through our eyes

May 2018
It is nearly ten years since the beginning of the Boko Haram insurgency in northeast Nigeria. Throughout the insurgency, the perspectives of local populations have all too-often been overlooked and excluded. Existing ‘community engagement’ has often been limited to consultation with community elders and traditional leaders on the assumption that they represent the voice of their constituents. This research, conducted in partnership between Conciliation Resources and the Kukah Centre, seeks to capture the local population’s perspectives on existing responses to the violence and their vision for long-term solutions.